When it comes to blogs, original is best

When it comes to blogs, original is best
by Paul MacKenzie-Cummins
by Paul MacKenzie-Cummins

There is a trend that has been gaining momentum over the last few years – companies want a steady flow of blogs and articles on their websites. But the time required to produce this content is not on their side. In the fervour to ensure both volume and  frequency, many companies fall back on using other people’s content. This is their undoing.

The idea of a blog is two-fold. First, it boosts your SEO and makes it easier to be found online. At the same time, it drives new traffic to the company’s website. This in turn leads to an increase in the number of new business enquiries received and, ultimately, sales.

But this can only happen if the content is appealing in the first place, which leads us to the second point. Content that converts readers into buyers is ‘valuable’ to the people you want to do business with. To resonate with those audiences, it needs to be informative, relevant, educational or entertaining. If you can combine all four you’re on to a winner.

By using other people’s content via aggregator tools such as Passle, you are sharing the opinions of others. Not only that, because copyright law dictates that the original source is cited within the post, you are effectively signposting another website. So, to read the article they are interested in, the reader you have fought hard to attract will leave your site as quickly as they arrived on it. How does this benefit you? It doesn’t.

On the one hand, it shows that you have your finger on the pulse of what is happening within your sector. So, in that regard, aggregating content is a good idea. On the other hand, the thoughts shared are not yours and the reader has no idea what you think about the subject. Do you get the sector at all? Is there enough to keep them interested on your landing page so that they will return to your site once they have read the content they were interested elsewhere? Have you lost the chance to effectively engage with that person?

It takes time to produce original content. But if you want your business – and its people – to be regarded as true experts in their field, sharing other people’s ideas and insights isn’t the way to go about. Doing so on social media is absolutely the right thing to do, but you need to balance it with your own.

For every blog we produce we have generated £572.00 in new business

People buy from people is a cliché, yet it is true. Your prospects want to know what you think when they engage with you. They need to see that you ‘get’ their pain points, challenges and obstacles that they face in their organisations. So, use your blog to demonstrate the thought leadership of your teams and not that of others who have nothing to do with it.

Promoting the thoughts, ideas and general content of others via your own blog is an own goal. It suggests you have little thought of your own and could damage your credibility and reputation as a true expert in your field. Yes, writing good content takes time and my one response to that is simply…tough: invest in your business and the rewards will come. We have seen this for ourselves.

We recently analysed the sources of each of our current portfolio of 16 clients and three have come from our blog over the last 12 months. This has generated £55,000 in additional revenues for us. We do two blogs a week, which equates to half a day of work. Or in pounds, shillings and pence, for every blog we produce we have generated £572.00 in new business. How much could your business be generating simply by writing about what you know each week?

If you need support in getting your thought and ideas on screen, get in touch with us today. We’re a team of experienced writers and qualified journalists as well as PRs. We’ll help turn your ideas into thought leadership content that will impress and win you new business. See what you can get and for how much.